American Badger

Creature Feature, Uncategorized

Meet our American Badger, Bandit! When you visit Wildlife Safari you may get a chance to watch this little guy dig in his dig box, or take a morning stroll through the Village. But watch your feet because he is a fast walker! Bandit loves to roam the grounds, listening to the different animals we have at the park.

Bandit the American Badger – Photo courtesy of Jessica Lundquist

Badgers have rounded ears to help them listen for their prey, which are usually hiding underground. They hunt a variety of small mammals, like mice and gophers, along with birds and snakes. They will also eat a few veggies, but most of their diet is made up of meat. They catch their prey by using their long claws to dig into their prey’s burrows. Sometimes, badgers will even work with coyotes! The badger will scare the prey out of the hole, the coyote will catch it, then share the meal together.

Morning stretches – Photo courtesy of Bryanna Bright

American Badgers spend most of their life digging. They love to dig! Their long claws help them to dig out their own burrows or modify an abandoned burrow. These typically only have one entrance and can reach ten meters long and three meters deep. They use their burrows to sleep, eat, and to escape predators. They can dig at amazing speeds by using their front claws to claw into the ground and their back feet work as shovels to scoop and push away the soil. If you want to see this amazing digging power, you can watch Bandit dig in his dig box most mornings at 11:00 am!

Ready for his close up – Photo courtesy of Jessica Lundquist

If you look closely at Bandit, you will notice a white stripe that runs from his nose to the back of his head, like a skunk. The white stripe is a warning to other animals to stay away, because they are dangerous! If a badger is threatened or attacked they become very vocal and will use their sharp teeth and claws to protect themselves. They also have thick, loose skin that makes it hard for a predator to hang onto them and makes it difficult to actually hurt the badger.

You can find American Badgers in the wild from Canada to Mexico. If you ever come across one outside of Wildlife Safari, always make sure to give them lots of space and let them continue on their way!

Keeping it Cool

Behind the Scenes, Carnivores, Cheetahs, Keeper Chats, Uncategorized

With the hot summer sun heating up our days, many of the animals at Wildlife Safari are getting ice treats!

Bandit enjoying an ice bath on a hot summers day

Bandit the American Badger enjoying an ice bath on a hot summers day

Pancake, Wildlife Safari's youngest cheetah, investigates some ice cubes

Pancake, Wildlife Safari’s youngest cheetah, investigates some ice cubes

Whether it’s ice to cool down or play with, or popsicle treats, its a good way for the animals to cool down and a more challenging way to get a snack!

Black bears enjoying a fruit popsicle!

Black bears enjoying a fruit popsicle!

 

Bandit the Badger

Ambassador Days, Creature Feature

Normally found in either his den or his dig box, Bandit the American Badger has a pretty relaxed life here at Wildlife Safari. Aptly named, Bandit tends to steal people’s hearts with his wonderful personality and incredible good looks.

Bandit the American Badger

Bandit the American Badger

Like all badgers, Bandit has a passion for digging. Whether its in his dig box, or in the gardens while on a walk with his keepers, once he starts digging he won’t stop until he finds something interesting or has a big enough hole to lay down in. “Being a fossorial animal, he absolutely loves digging,” says Leila Goulet, Director of Education at Wildlife Safari, and one of Bandit’s keepers. Which leads us to another of Bandit’s passions: napping.

Bandit enjoying an ice bath on a hot summers day

Bandit enjoying an ice bath on a hot summers day

Badgers go into what we call a torpor during the winter months, which is a kind of hibernation. It isn’t as complete as other forms of hibernation, for example bears will not eat or go to the bathroom for their entire four months. Instead, badgers will choose to sleep through many of the colder days of winter, relying on their stores of fat built up in the summer months, but will get up and find food if the weather is mild enough.

Bandit in his den box

Bandit in his den box

Badgers are omnivores, which means they eat meat, vegetables and fruit. For their meat they will usually eat mice, small birds or chicks, eggs and insects. The rest of their food they will forage for and it will depend on what is growing in their area, changing seasonally. Bandit loves berries of any kind, the juicier the better! He is not, however, a fan of anything green. Whenever keepers try to see if broccoli or green beans are acceptable to him, they usually find them in his dig box the next day – apparently the offending vegetable must be put out of site. His attitude towards greens does change though if they are slathered in mashed raspberries!

Badgers are known for their aggression – they are solitary creatures and quite territorial. “Badgers are very spunky animals,” says Julianne Rose, Lead Educator at Wildlife Safari and one of Bandit’s keepers. “An American Badger will challenge large animals like bears that wander into their territory.” Bandit, however, has been hand raised. Orphaned when he was young and taken in by a family who passed him along to Wildlife Safari when he became too rambunctious. Since he is used to human contact and attention, rather than being aggressive, Bandit is actually quite affectionate towards his keepers. He is particularly fond of back scratches.

Bandit enjoying a cardboard box

Bandit enjoying a cardboard box

Bandit is trained to do a number of things that make it easier for his keepers to look after him, including going into his travel crate and stationing on a mat for his harness to be put on. Badgers are very clever creatures, which is helpful for foraging for food, and for learning things with training, but can lead to some stubbornness. If an animal is smart enough to work out how to do something, they are generally smart enough to work out how NOT to do it. “Bandit is extremely intelligent, which means that he also has the luxury of being extremely stubborn,” Goulet explains. “When we were teaching him how to go into his travel crate on his own, he realized what we were asking him to do and went inside. The only catch was that he didn’t want us to close the door, so he made sure that he stuck his back paw outside so that we wouldn’t be able to close it!”

One of the ways Bandit charms everyone he meets is through his playfulness. Although, this can hinder some of the duties his keepers need to complete. “One afternoon while I was cleaning his enclosure, he attempted to pull the broom out of my hands. When this failed, he ran to the dustpan, kicked everything out and sat on it,” says Rose.

Bandit helping his keepers clean his enclosure

Bandit “helping” his keepers clean his enclosure

While Bandit’s “help” with cleaning is just for his keepers to handle, you can see him displaying his digging skills in Safari Village! Check the sign on the dig box outside of the gift shop to see what time he’ll be arriving to play!

Bandit's dig box in Safari Village

Bandit’s dig box in Safari Village

Eager Little Faces

Behind the Scenes

Many of the animals at Wildlife Safari get trained every single day, and are usually waiting excitedly for whatever treats their training session will bring. Those that don’t often still get a midday snack – and they sure know when it’s snack time!

So when keepers come past, we often see some eager little faces peering at us hoping for some treats. Here are some of the faces we see everyday!

 

One of our 6 lion cubs waiting not so patiently for training to begin

One of our 6 lion cubs waiting not so patiently for training to begin

Tiger eyes

One of the Sumatran tiger girls checking if her keeper has treats.

Goat nose

Ginger the goat sniffs around hoping for some yummy petting zoo pellets!

IMG_2471

Bandit the American Badger is hard to say no to with that face!