Meet our Ostriches!

Creature Feature
IMG_1164

Desi, waiting to say hello to guest entering safari.

At Wildlife Safari we have three ostriches living throughout our North and South Africa sections. Both Truffle, one of our male ostriches, and Cordial, our female ostrich have been at the safari for around six years. Desi, our other male ostrich, has been at the safari for twenty four years. Ostriches can live up to 45 years so all of our ostriches are still in their prime! Male and female ostriches look very similar but there are ways to tell them apart. Male ostriches feathers are mostly black whereas females feathers are mostly brown. Males can also grow considerably taller than females. Females can reach heights of between 5’7 and 6’7 and males range from 6’11 up to 9’2.

Although ostriches have wings, they are one of many species of flightless birds. What they lack in flying they make up for in running. With their long legs they can reach speeds of up to 43 mph making them the fastest land bird. That means they can run 16 miles faster the the fastest man in the world! Some of their closest bird relatives include rheas and emus, both of which you can see in the asia section of the safari. Ostriches can weigh a lot more than most of their other bird relatives. Adults can weigh anywhere from 140-320 pounds.

fullsizeoutput_263f

Cordial saying hello to a passing car

Ostriches are omnivores meaning they eat both meat and plants, although a much larger portion of their diet is plants such as grasses, fruits, and flowers. Our ostriches always enjoy when they recieve extra produce in their diets! Because of what they eat, ostriches can often go days without water getting most of their needed moisture from the plants they ingest.

Ostriches have large eyes. Each of their eyes are about the size of a billiard ball. Because their eyes take up so much space, there isn’t much room left for their brains. Ostrich brains are smaller than their eyes. Although they do have smaller brains relative to other bird species, they are still quite intelligent and resourceful.

IMG_1165

Cordial, our female ostrich, relaxing

A common misconception about ostriches is that when they’re scared, they stick their heads in the sand. While this isn’t true they often sleep with their heads flat against the ground giving the illusion that they are hiding. When spotted by a predator, ostriches will use their strong, long legs to run away usually out running their predators in Africa.

Ostriches reach sexual maturity at between two and four years, and usually form groups of one male and two to seven females. Although males will breed with many females in the surrounding area, they will only form a bond with one special female. Ostriches are known for having large eggs. They produce the largest egg of any bird species with each egg weighing close to three pounds. Even though their eggs are the largest mass wise, they actually are the smallest size relative to how large the adults are. A three pound egg could be just 1% of how large the female is. By contrast, a kiwi’s egg has the largest mass relative to its body weight at 15-20% of the mothers mass.       

IMG_1167

Truffle dancing for his favorite keepers

There’s a lot to love about ostriches, especially all of our ostriches. Each of our ostriches have very different personality, so make sure you find all three at your next visit to Wildlife Safari!

 

Advertisements

The Importance of Research in Zoos

Uncategorized

When people think of research in zoos, they think of what zoos do for populations out in the wild. They do not think that reseIMG_E9091arch on the animals inside the zoos are just as important. However, they allow improvement of animal welfare for captive populations, findings can be used elsewhere, and the research that is conducted can be used as a teaching moment.

The research that is conducted can range from yard usage to behavioral studies. For instance, an animal can be relocated from one enclosure to a new one that is thought to be more suitable. A study over yard usage can show statistically which aspects of the yard are used more often than others. Those aspects that seem to be more favorable can then be supplied more often or at a greater quantity. Behavioral studies can be used in instances of introduction of a new member to the group.

These findings don’t have to stop at the observed population, they can be sent off to other departments, zoos, or even wild populations. Zoos are always striving to make their captive populations as comfortable and true to their species as possible. If one zoo finds something that agrees with their population they will often share it with others to better the whole. Especially with behavioral studies, the information can be used for wild populations in order for them to be able to flourish. For example, being able to understand the language between elephants is helping the fight against poachers due to the conversation elephants have amongst each other.

 

For the Love of Learning!

Behind the Scenes, Community, Keeper Chats, Uncategorized

Nestled in behind Safari Village is the Wildlife Safari Education building. Home to snakes, birds, cavies and many more, the Education building is always a hive of activity. The Education department hosts tours, day camps, overnight adventures, and zookeepers-in-training. Since teaching people about animals and the environment is a vital part of conservation, the Education team have an important role.

Julianne w ponderosa

Education Lead, Julianne with Ponderosa the Red Tail Boa

Everyday involves a mix of animal husbandry and working with people of all ages. “We provide a lot of really hands on encounters with the animals, which is very rewarding for us, as well as for the public – to have those intimate interactions with the animals,” says Kendra Hodgson, Summer Camp Coordinator “It’s cool how much our senses are involved in education with the things that we do, many people need to touch and create, and see things close up – it really builds those connections.”

As well as the hands on animal work that they do, Education staff love sharing their passion for conservation and their interest in animals. It’s a unique joy to see people connecting with the animals and the smiles as they understand the amazing ways animals are built and behave. Harleena Franklin, who is interning with the department says that her favorite part of the job is interacting with people and watching them learn. “It’s instant gratification to see someone understand something,” she says.

J talk w Kotori

Julianne with Western Screech owl, Kotori

Although they work with people of all ages, with camps and school outreaches, the Education team has a big focus working with kids. While this often makes work more fun and games than “work” it definitely poses it’s challenges. “Kids are in need of a lot more stimuli than adults, so it can be a lot more fun, but a lot more challenging than working with adults,” says Hodgson. Having kids around can also take your day in some unexpected directions. Caitlin Huff, Junior Zookeeper Coordinator, says that last year she became safe-keeper of a tooth that had fallen out. A very important job for sure, but not quite what she had expected earlier in the day. (Update: the tooth made it safely to the tooth fairy.)

Arctic Adventure winter camp crafts

Arctic Adventure winter camp crafts

Painting, making crafts, showing kids how to move like animals, the list goes on – this team definitely has its share of fun and games, but that’s only part of the reward staff get from being involved. The kids bring a special attitude and enthusiasm that the Education team loves to see. “Kids always have very unique ideas and approaches, they’re a lot easier to get engaged and caring about things,” says Huff.

“Kids ask a ton of questions, so it can be a lot of fun to be around a group of really engaging kids that want to learn things, says Mack Stamper, an intern in the education department. “They’re very receptive to answers – they are genuinely curious.”

Another unique and rewarding program is the partnership Wildlife Safari has with the Dillard Alternative High School. In this program, students spend 4 days a week at Safari and are able to complete their high school credits in a non-traditional way. They are taught High School English, Science and Math, while interacting with the animals and completing special animal projects. “This program is important to high school students who are unable to learn in a formal classroom setting,” explains Leila Goulet, Director of Education. “These classes allow students to learn in a hands-on way and use various forms of assessment to evaluate the students rather than traditional testing. This program has been highly successful and is even gaining tread with other schools!”

Staff, adults and kids all have tons of fun with our education programs, so keep an eye out on the Wildlife Safari website for chances to come join in!