Gussie the Great Horned Owl

Ambassador Days, Creature Feature, Uncategorized

Gussie is Wildlife Safari’s resident Great Horned Owl. Her species is common throughout north, central and south America – one of the most widespread species of owl.

These guys get their name from the plumage on their heads that resemble horns, although they are actually just feathers (called plumicorns), not horns at all. These plumicorns are also often mistaken for ears, however, their real ears actually cannot be seen from outside the feathers, and unlike humans, these ears are holes with no outer fleshy part. Unlike most animals, their ears are not symmetrical. Instead, they are slightly off set to create more of a surround sound effect. This allows them to pinpoint where a sound came from – an important skill for a predator that hunts at night from above.

They have an incredibly strong grip, much stronger than a human’s, which makes them extremely effective predators. They catch pretty much everything with their feet and talons, which are razor sharp, and they are so strong they can even catch things that are up to 3 times their size or body weight.

“Gussie likes to act big and bad when shes in her enclosure – but she’s a great training animal,” shares Jennifer Wiles, one of Gussie’s Keepers. She says Gussie is not as tough as she thinks, though. “Once she’s out she can be a little bit of a scardy-owl.”

The reason Gussie is not so tough once outside of her house may be because her eyesight is not the precise, incredible eyesight she once had. Before she came to Wildlife Safari she was in an accident that left her mostly without sight in her left eye. “She can fly but her depth perception is off, so she’ll only fly short distances,” says Jennifer – and that is exactly why Gussie lives at the park. As a predator, she would not be able to hunt and survive in the wild without full vision. “All our birds of prey have been rehabilitated and can’t be released back into the wild because of either eye or wing issues.”

Gussie now has a happy life here at the park with her keepers. Here she acts as an ambassador, helping people learn about owls and their amazing senses.

 

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Kotori the Tiny Owl

Ambassador Days, Creature Feature, Uncategorized

Wildlife Safari’s ambassador animals come in lots of shapes and sizes. One of our feathered friends that goes out into the community is a small owl by the name of Kotori. Kotori is a Western Screech owl, native to Oregon.

Kotori may look tiny, but she is fully grown. Western Screech owls in the wild will tend to hunt small mice, frogs or lizards (although mice are Kotori’s particular favorite).

Kotori the Western Screech Owl

Kotori the Western Screech Owl

Although she is small, she’s packed full of attitude. “She has a perfect¬† glare that she will give if we move her house, bother her, or pick her up when she doesn’t want to be,” says Julianne Rose, Lead Educator and one of Kotori’s keepers. While she might give her keepers some sass, she loves the change in environment that outreaches bring, and is comfortable being out and about. “She loves being out and about in the great outdoors and shes great with small children and big groups,” says Rose.

In the wild, birds like Kotori spend most of their time perched in a tree checking out their surroundings, and Kotori holds onto those instincts, enjoying any way she can be high up and get a good view. “Anything she can perch on shes a huge fan of,” says Rose. “Things like large stuffed animals, large branches, twigs, elevated perches – though not too high because she is missing a wing – and anything she can hide in, like boxes, igloos.. ”

Sleepy Kotori

Sleepy Kotori

Apart from her grumpiness, she has lots of other ways in which she shows her personality. She won’t eat in front of her keepers, preferring to wait until everyone has left, and she LOVES to bathe in her water dish. Keepers are often greeted in the morning with evidence of her pool parties – water everywhere!

Keeper Julianne gets Kotori ready for an outreach

Keeper Julianne gets Kotori ready for an outreach

Kotori’s missing wing is the reason she has a home here at Wildlife Safari. Although she started life in the wild, she was in a car accident and now could not survive if left to fend for herself. “She was a wild owl that had a collision with a truck,” explains Rose. “Either the driver or some other kind soul took her to a rehab clinic. They tried their darndest,¬† but they realized that she was not going to be releasable. That wing break was too severe and would not be able to mend itself. So she did lose a wing, and obviously as a predator that would not be good for her in the wild, she would not be able to catch the food she needed, and since she is a small owl she wouldn’t be able to escape from things that were trying to eat her. “

Kotori with Keeper Julianne

Kotori with Keeper Julianne

Despite having a rough start, Kotori now has a happy life here at the park, and while she might be sassy, her big eyes peering at you from a small bundle of feathers is pretty darn cute. If you ever see one of our animal shows or outreaches you may get to meet her!