Meet Dumai

Carnivores, Creature Feature

Say hello to Wildlife Safari’s newest Sumatran Tiger, Dumai. Dumai came to us in January from Point Defiance Zoo in Tacoma, Washington. He was born and raised at PDZ and stole many hearts there over the last six years. Dumai is such a great new addition to our team and we are very excited to have him.  He is such a loveable guy and very easy going.

He was brought to us as part of the Species Survival Plan (also known as the SSP). He was recommended as a mate for our two female Sumatran tigers, Riya and Kemala. What is the SSP? It is basically like match.com for endangered or vulnerable species. This programs has each individual’s genetics on file and pairs them with a match that will produce the most unique genetics. This prevents any in breeding or one male or female from producing all the offspring. This is helping save wild populations. The Sumatran tiger is one of the most endangered living species of tigers. They only live on the island of Sumatra and are facing many challenges. One of these challenges is small population size, in turn leading to in breeding. This leads to many other health concerns. Zoos can help save this species by having a backup genetic pool. By making sure our population is healthy and diverse, the goal is we can possibly AI females in the wild with our genetics in order to prevent more inbreeding from happening, which will help keep the wild population healthy. Come see Dumai and our two females in the cheetah drive through.

dumai snow

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Beauty more than fur deep…

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You’re probably familiar with the characteristic spots on cheetahs, and stripes on tigers, but not many people have had the chance to look at them closely. These two species both have what we call “true” markings, where their spots or stripes go all the way down to the skin! This means that it is not just the fur that has these bold patterns, its their skin as well.

Riya the Sumatran tiger

Riya the Sumatran tiger

These patterns help them to camouflage and hide in their surroundings, helping them to sneak up on their prey unseen.


While they may seem pretty conspicuous up close, when they are in amongst grass or bushes in dappled sunlight they are extremely difficult to spot.